Baffling: What Women Pay for Purses!

Douglas and I were at a new restaurant that I wanted to try. As we were eating, a lady spotted my purse and commented on how much it was like the one she was carrying. Sure enough, it was nearly a clone. Hers was a Michael Kors, with the same MK in a round label. The only visible difference was that my purse had a zippered back, which she envied.

I had no idea who the designer was for my purse, as I bought the bag in Spain in October after my trusted traveling pocketbook broke during the flight over. I paid 27 euros for it, mainly because it was so roomy. I have received many compliments on the bag, which amazed me for something that didn’t cost $30.

So, I thanked her and told her the price I had paid, which stunned her. I was even more flabbergasted to hear that her nearly identical purse cost over $300! “Heavens to Betsy, why’d you do that?” I wanted to ask her. There is no way that I am paying three hundred dollars for a pocketbook that simply carries “stuff.” I don’t think I have ever paid more than $50, if that much.

I reason that if you don’t have $300 to put in a wallet, then maybe you should not pay that much for the bag. In a film that I showed students on the spending habits of the new rich, there was a Louis Vuitton bag for $18,000! What do you carry in a purse that costs that much, gold and silver?

The woman looked at my purse and compared them again, and if put on a shelf, no one could tell which was the cheaper one. Yes, mine is obviously a knock-off. She finally told me that I had gotten a great deal, but she walked away looking as though she had been swindled.

What is interesting to me is that I don’t look at someone’s purse to determine their social class status, but obviously others do, for she thought that we had something in common sporting the “same” purse. I understand now that women pay so much for handbags because they are status symbols used by others to determine a person’s status and, thus, if you are worthy to be spoken to or just to be ignored.

So, now I comprehend why people look at my bag and smile and compliment me. They think it is an expensive bag, and they determine my value and worth from it. How quickly their ideas would change if they spoke to me, because I get a kick out of telling people what it costs, believing that I got a real bargain in Spain that I could not have gotten in the United States. Boy did I ever!

True story written for the Story Starter Challenge #3 from The Haunted Wordsmith: Heavens to Betsy, why’s you do that?

Also written for Weekly Prompts from GC and Sue W: Baffling.

9 thoughts on “Baffling: What Women Pay for Purses!

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  1. I am amazed that so many women are mesmerized by the name on their purses, shoes, dresses and scarves. The prices are totally outrageous but many folks are willing to part with their hard earned cash so they can advertise a rich designer. Prada anyone?

    Liked by 1 person

  2. My eldest daughter uually buys designer handbags. I can see the difference in quality immediately . At Christmas she received a designer bag from her husband and passed on her last one to me.

    I absolutely love this bag and I feel good when carrying it, can’t explain it but love the feeling!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. There are professional ladies who work hard, earn upwards of $150,000 annually and run in circles with women of the same.
    I agree with your statement, “if you don’t have $300 to put in a wallet, then maybe you should not pay that much for the bag.”
    However, if you do, have at it. It takes all income brackets to make a world.

    Liked by 1 person

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